Tag: Values

Tuesday’s Thoughts: Implicit Bias in Sacred Stories

Tuesday’s Thoughts: Implicit Bias in Sacred Stories

bible, Scripture
From my daily practice today, I encountered implicit bias. Implicit bias is: "The attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions in an unconscious manner.  These biases, which encompass both favorable and unfavorable assessments, are activated involuntarily and without an individual’s awareness or intentional control.  Residing deep in the subconscious, these biases are different from known biases that individuals may choose to conceal for the purposes of social and/or political correctness.  Rather, implicit biases are not accessible through introspection." The dude in today's story needs the reiteration of another dude to understand and hear the woman. There you have it. A Few Key Characteristics of Implicit Biases from the Kirwan Institute: Imp
Tuesday’s Thoughts: It’s a Gay Wedding

Tuesday’s Thoughts: It’s a Gay Wedding

bible, Scripture
Tuesday's Haiku and journaling The twelve are gathered Considering inclusion The gate swings open [end] Ruth 3-4 Ruth has been set up with Boaz. A few things to note, in the Bible, when it talks about feet, it often means male sex organs. And in this scripture specifically, There are feet, lying down together, and shuddering, and covering. This is sex, my friends. So Ruth and Boaz have sex. Boaz and then needs to clear everything with the rest of the community. He is one of the 12 that gather at the gate to decide what to do with the Ruth and Naomi and their property. He is a redeemer. He states there is another redeemer greater than him. This is someone who is closer in relationship with Naomi them Boaz and has first rights on Naomi’s property. And yet the gathering of the 12 at
Time of Orphaning

Time of Orphaning

death, Grief, Short Story
It’s tough when you are orphaned at seventy. I say that without rancor or irony. I’d known Mrs. O’Donall and her daughter for fifteen years, which at the time of this story was the entire length of my life. The ladies - as everyone called them - were fixtures in our parish. Each morning they arrived at St. Anselm's at precisely six-fifty for daily Mass. Their consistency was such that my mom said she "could tell time by them." They generally made their way into church arm-in-arm and always sat in the first pew. While the younger lady was fragile, tentative and wide-eyed, the older one was stern, sturdy and quick-minded. With her daughter in tow, she worked on the Annual Church Carnival Planning Committee and in the Women’s Auxiliary as well, relied upon to help the nuns clean the sac