Friday, April 16
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Tag: thoughtfulness

Daily Practice for June 7, 2016

Daily Practice for June 7, 2016

Word: Yesterday, I made a choice to do self-care (go to the Emergency Room) rather than "tough it out" and lead the quarterly meeting I coordinate for Juvenile Justice practitioners. In the end, I could have toughed it out, but the choice for self-care was good given the choices of what could have gone wrong. I quickly filled in Kerry McCarter (she's awesome) on the agenda and how to lead the meeting. Heidi Satterburg (she's also awesome) was the note taker and awesome communicator. People arrived and plans were laid. I'm told a spirit of excitement was in the air. New things are afoot that will *hopefully* change the trajectory of youth who are on the wrong track. First, apologies to the male readers. Now, on to the real topic. What I really want to focus on here is self care. Wome...
Daily Practice for June 6, 2016

Daily Practice for June 6, 2016

Word: The twitterverse is abuzz with the shocking letter / plea from Brock Turner's father to the courts and the plea for leniency contained within. Brock Turner is the Stanford super-star swimmer who raped a woman who was unconscious, outside by a club. The entire incident was swimming with privilege because he was sentenced to six months rather than the 3-6 years most rapists receive. Why privilege? He is white, wealthy, and educated. The letter his father wrote on behalf of his son lifts up all the privilege Brock grew up in. It is interesting to note that Cory Batey, a football player at Vanderbilt University, and a black man, who raped an unconscious woman, will likely serve up to 25 years in jail. (Keep your eyes open for the sentencing hearing which was delayed from May 20.) In ...
Daily Practice for June 5, 2016

Daily Practice for June 5, 2016

Word: Sometimes it seems that the world is going topsy turvy. We have lawmakers passing laws to solve problems that don't exist! Louisiana passed a law making public safety workers (i.e. police) a protected class under hate crime laws. Governing, reports that the combined group of police and correction officers had a fatality rate of 5 people in 2012. Now, I don't want to see any fatalities. But this law is called #bluelivesmatter and is a direct outgrowth against #blacklivesmatter. It is also trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist. The fatality rate in Louisiana was almost the exact same across five years. There has been no big scary increase accompanying the rise in activism by #blacklivesmatter. Sigh. And then there is the bathroom laws popping up. In Washington, the have had ...