Tag: The Great Depression

Nationhood And “The Root Of All Evil”

Nationhood And “The Root Of All Evil”

Abundance, activism, awareness, bigotry, causality, Challenge, Change, citizenship, civics, Compassion, conflict, conservatism, Consumerism, critical judgment, culture, Economy, Ethics, Failing, Fascism, hate, history, Ideology, injustice, justice, law, Muslims, Naziism, Paul von Hindenburg, political rhetoric, Politics, Poverty, racism, resentment, Secularity, social justice, soldiers, Statistics, Suffering, Tolerance, Treaty of Versailles, Uncategorized, Weimar Republic, World War I
I recently told my Beguine editor, Terri Stewart, that, because I regarded the re-election of Trump as quite likely, I considered politics a dead subject for leftists / progressives, at least for the near- and medium-term future, and that I would henceforth write about science, art, philosophy, in other words, anything except politics. I had every intention of abiding by that resolution until I read a column by Hugh Hewitt in the Washington Post of April 27 exulting in his prediction – which, to repeat, is probably accurate – that Trump would not only win the election in 2020, but that the election would not even be “close” (Hewitt’s word, not mine). The reasons Hewitt cites for that prediction, while factually accurate, go straight to the heart of what it means to be a nation – and,
ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE WALDORF HOTEL, Langston Hughes, Part One

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE WALDORF HOTEL, Langston Hughes, Part One

injustice, poem, Poetry, Poverty
Even as I sorted through books one day - including cookbooks - in preparation for a garage sale to be held before moving into disabled-senior housing, a new cookbook enters. A gift from my son, it's Oscar Tschirky's (1886-1950) recipe collection. Oscar Tschirky was the famous maître d'hôtel at the Waldorf-Astoria, which has some special meaning for me. Occasionally my mom liked to go to the café there for blueberry pancakes. It was as close as she could get to being an elegant respectable lady as the world defines such. The book reminds me of her and the poem that follows. Langston Hughes wrote the poem after walking past the Waldorf during the Great Depression. I've read that it was originally published in New Masses magazine, a long defunct American Marxist publication that was th