Tag: suffering

Mindful Monday: Holding suffering in love

Mindful Monday: Holding suffering in love

awareness, mindfulness
The mind returns again and again to unresolved emotional issues for two basic reasons: First, the ego-mind is magnetically drawn to negativity because that is what sustains its point of view. Negativity by its very nature is magnetic; it pulls everything in toward itself much like physical mass creates gravity. Second, negativity is looking for resolution and release. All forms of suffering seek to be free from the grip of sorrow. Sometimes the ways suffering seeks release only create more sorrow, as when one succumbs to blame, shame, victimhood, control, guilt, etc. But when suffering seeks its release through compassion, love, and wisdom, the doors to resolution and freedom begin to open. The first and most important step is to remain fully conscious and present in the face of sufferi...
Mindful Monday: Go home

Mindful Monday: Go home

awareness, Buddhism, mindfulness
Go back and take care of yourself. Your body needs you, your feelings need you, your perceptions need you. Your suffering needs you to acknowledge it. Go home and be there for all these things. — Thich Nhat Hanh What are you noticing about your body, feelings, and perceptions in the present moment? ... for Mindful Monday ... Photo credit: "Meditation on Water," mario, 2012.
Mindful Monday: A thousand eyes of wisdom

Mindful Monday: A thousand eyes of wisdom

awareness, Buddhism, mindfulness
"... I wrote about the suffering of my own childhood and my years of feeling isolated and unhappy. When he read it, my friend Bob Thurman said, 'You should never be ashamed of the suffering you've been through.' His comment really surprised me. In that moment, I realized how much subtle shame I had been carrying without realizing it. "Bob was passing along a message he'd received years earlier, after he'd lost his left eye in an accident.  His teacher at the time, a Mongolian monk named Geshe Wangyal, had told him, 'Never be ashamed of what happened to you. You have lost one eye but gained a thousand eyes of wisdom.' "I do think it's too simplistic to say that such awful experiences should be considered gifts. But acknowledging that a gift can emerge from pain does not mock the pain