Tag: skeptic

Tuesday’s Artful Response: Ethic of Life

Tuesday’s Artful Response: Ethic of Life

Uncategorized
I am not sure today's response is "artful" in that I have not done an art project, but it is in response to what my friend James wrote on Thursday. So first, I'll start with a haiku: the first seed dropsconstitutes, forms, lives, and diesbeginning again It was very tempting to put "beguine-ing again". However, I want to respond to this: "Conclusion:  a religiously grounded anti-abortion ideology is a dead letter." James Cowles I totally agree. You can't get to anti-abortion ideology without disregarding God's own abortion plan. In Numbers 5:11-22, "The Test for an Unfaithful Wife," verses 16-18 are about the "water of bitterness" that brings on "the curse." And, the priests, no less, were the people who prescribed the abortion. Socially, I bet it was a lot easier to cause
Womb with a View — Questions in the Wake of "Hobby Lobby"

Womb with a View — Questions in the Wake of "Hobby Lobby"

Religion, spiritual practice
The long-awaited Supreme Court opinion in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc. regarding the constitutionality of the contraception mandate in the Affordable Care Act was handed down yesterday Monday 30 June. (I do not consider the companion case of Conestoga Wood Products, because the Conestoga case is essentially identical.) In a nutshell, the Court held that for-profit corporations that are “closely held” – i.e., that are privately owned and that do not issue stock – may be exempted from the as-written contraception requirement, in instances where that requirement violates the religious conscience and principles of the business owners. Publicly traded corporations – e.g., Boeing, Microsoft, Amazon, et al. – are not exempt. At issue in the case were four contraceptive drugs on the FDA l
Human Faces And Human Nonsense

Human Faces And Human Nonsense

Christianity, Essay, Mythology, Religion, Science, Skeptic, spiritual practice, Spirituality
Skepticism is the chastity of the intellect, and it is shameful to surrender it too soon or to the first comer: there is nobility in preserving it coolly and proudly through long youth, until at last, in the ripeness of instinct and discretion, it can be safely exchanged for fidelity and happiness. -- George Santayana This morning and afternoon (9 March), I was watching the National Geographic Channel's back-to-back reprise of Carl Sagan's venerable 1980 series Cosmos, being re-broadcast in preparation for Dr. Neil DeGrasse Tyson's updated version, scheduled to start tonight.  The 1980-vintage Cosmos is as mesmerizing now as it was 34 years ago. But it set me to wondering:  why is it that, despite the deluge of books in the last generation or so explaining even subjects as abstruse as s