Tag: shame

Mindful Monday: A thousand eyes of wisdom

Mindful Monday: A thousand eyes of wisdom

awareness, Buddhism, mindfulness
"... I wrote about the suffering of my own childhood and my years of feeling isolated and unhappy. When he read it, my friend Bob Thurman said, 'You should never be ashamed of the suffering you've been through.' His comment really surprised me. In that moment, I realized how much subtle shame I had been carrying without realizing it. "Bob was passing along a message he'd received years earlier, after he'd lost his left eye in an accident.  His teacher at the time, a Mongolian monk named Geshe Wangyal, had told him, 'Never be ashamed of what happened to you. You have lost one eye but gained a thousand eyes of wisdom.' "I do think it's too simplistic to say that such awful experiences should be considered gifts. But acknowledging that a gift can emerge from pain does not mock the pain
Daily Practice for August 4, 2016

Daily Practice for August 4, 2016

Word: Today, I literally woke up wondering where I was going to park this morning. Parking is important in Seattle. Governed by tickets and permissions and prices and parallels. It is definitely a privilege. Even in the small neighborhoods where one would expect parking to be free, it is controlled by permissions and length of time. Two hours? Four hours? Red lines on curbs, yellow lines. This seems like a stupid thing to spend my energy on. Especially when my primary energy expulsion should be on preparing for my training class. And yet, there it is. It must be so hard to be folks that cannot afford parking. In Kirkland, WA, there is a program called the "Safe Parking Program" at Lake Washington UMC. They open their parking lot for homeless people who have cars (i.e. living in t...
Daily Practice for June 11, 2106

Daily Practice for June 11, 2106

Word: Somedays, my head goes to an angry place. Yesterday was such a day. It started with a Sentencing Guidelines Commission meeting. That is the state of Washington's think tank that advises the Senate and Congress about things we think would be really helpful. It is done with deliberation and care. Last year, we carefully crafted a proposal that would give a second look to those who were convicted under three strikes laws in Washington. The idea was that during the down-time between sessions, we would shop it around and find legislative sponsorship. Yesterday, our chair went into a whole presentation on why we should add in another group but he didn't tell us outright that he wanted to add another group into the second look--it was a clumsy attempt at a run around. It struck me, as I