Tag: privilege

Daily Practice for November 1, 2016

Daily Practice for November 1, 2016

Word:  By now, you have likely heard of the kerfluffle at the University of Chicago. It was caused in September when the Dean of Students sent out a letter saying that he did not support intellectual safe spaces nor did he support the giving of trigger warnings. Many people were outraged. Trigger warnings make it possible for people who have been traumatized to stay in the room. For example, in church, we showed a short video by lawyer/activist Bryan Stevenson. It has a scene of a lynching. I gave a warning that a violent image was coming up. There is nothing wrong with that. I could imagine that viewing photos of a lynching could be triggering. I gave permission for people to look away, but to hear what Stevenson was saying. Safe spaces are historically connected to a concern for the ma
Daily Practice for October 31, 2016

Daily Practice for October 31, 2016

Word:  Over the weekend, Colin Kaepernick, (the San Francisco 49ers Quarterback that has caused an uproar by silently taking a knee during the national anthem at football games), led a workshop for youth in Oakland titled, "Know Your Rights." I'm going to quote liberally from a Shaun King article. By the way, you should be reading Shaun King if you want to be current on who is laying down some truth! Kaep says: "We're here today to fight back and give you all lessons to combat the oppressive issues that our people face on a daily basis. We're here to give you tools to help you succeed,” he said. “We're going to give you knowledge on policing history, what the systems of policing in America were based on, and we're also going to teach you skills to make sure you always make it home safel
Daily Practice for October 6, 2016

Daily Practice for October 6, 2016

Word:  Yesterday, I talked about being color brave. And Lo! I had the opportunity to practice what I preached when an internet guy I didn't even know started telling me that racism didn't exist, he was offended by the idea he had privilege, and that bigotry was for those other guys, not him. He didn't quite say it as bluntly as I wrote it, but that is the essence. And since he said it a lot lower key, I engaged the conversation for just a little bit. He was responding to a cartoon by Matt Davies of Newsday that juxtaposed a certain politician saying "America's Not Great" with Colin Kaepernick saying the same thing. Of course, the politician is met with cheers while Kaep is met with boos. Since he wasn't downright rude, I engaged with an attitude of openness, education on statist