Tag: james cowles

Prayerful Tuesday: Daily Practice 2017.07.18

Prayerful Tuesday: Daily Practice 2017.07.18

prayer, Prayer Practice
Today I am doing a nested share. I'm sharing something I wrote that is a sharing about something someone else wrote. And so, nested share. At our website/blog, we have a daily practice. This is an open invitation daily practice. I try to write daily using the below pattern that has evolved for me over time. However, you are invited to submit your own daily practice at https://beguineagain.com/daily-practice-blog/. You will see a "Submit a Daily Practice" button on the upper right. I would LOVE to see your daily practice. Or weekly practice. Or monthly practice. Whatever gets you emotionally, spiritually, and physically through to the next day. If you want to read the daily practices, you can visit the blog daily or subscribe to the Facebook groups that it feeds to: The Bardo Group Be...
Daily Practice 2017.07.18 – Refuge, Reconciliation, and Recidivisim

Daily Practice 2017.07.18 – Refuge, Reconciliation, and Recidivisim

Word:  Continuing to share items from The BeZine, our sister publication. Today's sharing is from James Cowles. I met James online somewhere. I saw how intelligent and thoughtful he was. And I saw the passion he put forth in his drive towards and away from bad theology. He is a skeptic/atheist and I am a Christian/theist. On paper, we are quite different. But every bad theology that he decries, I am also appalled by. So there is that. While we were talking about his possible contribution to a Restorative Justice and Prison Culture issue, he thought he had nothing to give. Then he started talking about Pu’uhonua o Honaunau – in Hawaiian “the Refuge of Honaunau”. In fact, he did have quite a lot to say! (He always has quite a lot to say! That's why we love him.) I share with you an excer
Human Faces And Human Nonsense

Human Faces And Human Nonsense

Christianity, Essay, Mythology, Religion, Science, Skeptic, spiritual practice, Spirituality
Skepticism is the chastity of the intellect, and it is shameful to surrender it too soon or to the first comer: there is nobility in preserving it coolly and proudly through long youth, until at last, in the ripeness of instinct and discretion, it can be safely exchanged for fidelity and happiness. -- George Santayana This morning and afternoon (9 March), I was watching the National Geographic Channel's back-to-back reprise of Carl Sagan's venerable 1980 series Cosmos, being re-broadcast in preparation for Dr. Neil DeGrasse Tyson's updated version, scheduled to start tonight.  The 1980-vintage Cosmos is as mesmerizing now as it was 34 years ago. But it set me to wondering:  why is it that, despite the deluge of books in the last generation or so explaining even subjects as abstruse as s