Wednesday, August 4
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Tag: Friedrich Nietzsche

Daily Practice for July 28, 2016

Daily Practice for July 28, 2016

Word: Summarizing this weeks progression, I am writing on rituals that will "make you happy according to neuroscience." Or, rituals that release things like dopamine into your system that does, in fact, have the effect of happiness or pleasure. Monday - Wednesday, I looked at creating rituals for gratitude, naming negative emotions, and for decision making. Today, we are looking at touch. The neuroscientists point out that touch releases oxytocin into our systems. Now, as a mini-rant, I'd like to point out that in our prisons, no one is allowed to touch, therefore depriving them of oxytocin and a great leveling chemical in their bodies. Sigh. Returning to topic. Touch has several categories and corresponding changes on your body: Handshakes and pats on the back actually release...
Daily Practice for 2016.02.07

Daily Practice for 2016.02.07

Word: I am focusing on using people's vision words for 2016 for a few daily prayers. Today, I am using "wisdom" from Janice to guide my selections. If you share your word, I will use it over the next few days! I will be taking a break from words during Lent to focus on Lenten words. I am inspired by Native American words of wisdom, the poetry of Sri Chimnoy, and sacred words from Friedrich Nietzsche. The word wisdom always makes me think of the word sophia which is the Greek word for wisdom. Sophia shows up in Proverbs as the presence who was there during creation. Sophia also ties into Greek philosophy and was an honored goddess. It is no mistake at all that she is present in the story of creation in Proverbs 8! Sophia was powerful and has been stripped out of our understanding of ...
Mindful Monday: Attachment to strong opinions

Mindful Monday: Attachment to strong opinions

Buddhism, mindfulness, Spirituality
"As Buddhists, we need not give up even strong opinions and positions – but we do have to give up attachment to them. Not being attached to them is to abandon the idea that because I think or believe something, it is true. And abandon the idea that the opinions of others are somehow lacking just because they are another’s idea, not mine. This makes commitment to growing, evolving truth more important than opinions and positions. The great philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche said, 'A very popular error: having the courage of one’s convictions; rather it is a matter of having the courage for an attack on one’s convictions.' "This is the Buddhist way, too. Having a conviction, opinion, position, is inevitable. Holding to it carries no great virtue. Virtue is, while having a position, being open ...