Tag: foucault

Pondering the Premiere of the Post-Modern Presidency

Pondering the Premiere of the Post-Modern Presidency

activism, announcement, Atheism, autonomy, Change, Christian Church, Christianity, citizenship, civics, community, conservatism, Consitution, critical judgment, culture, Enlightenment, epistemology, Evidence, Freedom, Fundamentalism, God, Ideology, immigration, Islam, justice, law, monotheism, peace and justice, Philosophy, postmodernism, Presidency, progressive politics, Rationality, Religion, Secularity, Uncategorized
To a few of you, the following sentence will be like saying “Elvis has left the building”, i.e., old news. But to many others, it will be very much in the vein of “Main bites dog,” i.e., novel to the point of being revolutionary. Anyway, here goes … the European Enlightenment is now officially over.  “Over” as in “dead as last week’s oatmeal” or “as passé as disco fever and bell-bottom pants” or "As useless as invitations to Hillary Clinton's inaugural ball". (Yeah, I know ... still too soon for me, too ... sorry ... apologies!)  Probably many fewer of you are aware of the likely – not strictly certain, but this is the way to bet – replacement ideology:  (some form of) postmodernism.  Not to put too fine a point on it, but the operative word in the third sentence (beginning “Anyway, he
Amazement at Being Amazed — Torture and the Bible

Amazement at Being Amazed — Torture and the Bible

Atheism, critical judgment, culture, deconstruction, doubt, Enlightenment, epistemology, Freud, Hebrew Scripture, higher criticism, Human Condition, Ideology, Isaiah, monotheism, Philosophy, polyvocality, postmodernism, secularism, Skeptic, Spirituality, Theology
Back in April of 2009, the Pew Forum published the results of a survey The Religious Dimensions of the Torture Debate which attracted little more than passing interest at the time, but which has assumed additional significance in the wake of the publication of the so-called “torture report” under the auspices of Sen. Dianne Feinstein. The survey was updated in early May of 2009, and the updated version was published simultaneously with a cautionary note, The Torture Debate: A Closer Look , about possible reasons for the correlation of religious beliefs and attitudes toward torture. The latter publication wisely notes that, while religious beliefs may be decisive in determining attitudes toward torture, there is an equally strong possibility that both religious beliefs and attitudes toward