Thursday, June 4
Shadow

Tag: emotions

Tuesday’s Thoughts: J Mase III’s Artful Response to Life

Tuesday’s Thoughts: J Mase III’s Artful Response to Life

Art, book review, spirit, spiritual growth, spiritual practice, spiritual practices, Spirituality
Responding artfully is a trauma informed care practice as it takes you out of your wordy brain and into other parts of your knowledge or knowing process. Often we privilege language over other ways of knowing. J Mase III, in his latest book, And Then I Got Fired: One Transqueer’s Reflections on Grief, Unemployment & Inappropriate Jokes About Death, through the use of language, weaves together other responses such as emotion, imagination, and your felt senses. I know, it's hard to imagine how a book which is necessarily immersed in language can do that, but it does! And here is how: Mase shares his life authentically through prose and poetry. Poetry connects to imagination, one of the ways of knowing.Mase invites the reader to explore their own emotions. Emotion is a way of knowing...
Daily Practice for July 26, 2016

Daily Practice for July 26, 2016

Word: Continuing with our mini-series: rituals that will make you "happy" according to neuroscience, we move on from gratitude and move to "naming negative feelings." The reason I have been delving into the ritual aspect is that even though the research is good and has labeled it "ritual," they really aren't using ritual. They are simply saying "be grateful" or "name your emotions." That doesn't cut it. Those are practices, but they aren't ritual. Ritual creates a movement and an opening. Scientific American summarized research on ritual and pointed out an experiment on losing the lottery. In this experiment, they offered a winning stake of $200. They asked people how they would spend the money if they won. They drew a winner and that person left the room. Then they divided into two group...
Mindful Monday: Identifying less with emotions

Mindful Monday: Identifying less with emotions

awareness, Buddhism, mindfulness, peace
"In the end, we have done just the opposite of what we set out to do. We thought that protecting ourselves and paying attention to our feelings would make us happier, but actually, our unhappiness increased. In the dharma we have a saying, 'All people desire happiness, but instead they chase after suffering.' When we reflect on our relationship with our emotions, we can see just how true this is. "The Buddhist path has tools that help us train our mind so we don’t put so much energy into our emotional responses. By gradually reducing the focus we ordinarily place on our emotions, we begin to identify with them less. As we identify with our emotions less, we become more willing to let small situations go, and we begin to feel more relaxed. This starts a different kind of emotional cycle....