Tag: due process

Chief Justice John Marshall’s Brick Wall

Chief Justice John Marshall’s Brick Wall

14th Amendment, awareness, citizenship, civics, Consitution, courage, critical judgment, culture, declaration of independence, election year, Equality, faithfulness, First Amendment, Fourteenth Amendment, Ideology, inclusive, justice, law, peace and justice, Politics, Presidency, racism, republic, social justice, Supreme Court, theocracy, Uncategorized
This election year, I've been remembering a business trip I took to the Maryland suburbs of Washington, DC, several years ago. Whenever I travel to that part of the country, I always make time to visit friends in the area and places in the District that hold special meaning for me. One of those places is the National Archives, on the NW corner of 7th & Constitution, diagonally opposite the West Wing of the National Gallery. The Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights are always impressive, and on this years-ago occasion, no less so than usual. But on this visit, what impressed me the most was not the Founding Documents, but a little 3x5 note card affixed to the wall above the display case immediately flanking the Bill of Rights. The display case contained ...
An Open Letter To “Conscience-Driven” Trump Voters

An Open Letter To “Conscience-Driven” Trump Voters

14th Amendment, bigotry, Challenge, Change, citizenship, civics, Comfort, community, Compassion, conflict, conservatism, Consitution, courage, critical judgment, culture, election year, Equality, Ethics, Fear, First Amendment, Fourteenth Amendment, Ideology, immigration, injustice, Islam, justice, law, Minorities, Presidency, progressive politics, Religion, terrorism, Tolerance, Trump, Uncategorized, Xenophobia
I understand what it means to adopt an unpopular stand and to say unpopular things – things that could possibly cost valued relationships and reputations – purely on the basis of conscience, as you have elected to do in your decision to either refrain from voting altogether or to vote for Donald J. Trump.  I would only ask you to reflect on the particular building blocks that together make up the foundation of such a choice.  The question to be borne in mind as you do so is very direct and very simple:  Given your decision to support – if only by default – the candidacy of Donald Trump, will your conscience also accommodate the principles that go into that decision?  (This is really just an updated phrasing of that hoary old maxim in ethics "If you will the end, then you must will the