Tag: Civil War

“Marbury” And Me — An Autobiography

“Marbury” And Me — An Autobiography

autonomy, awareness, Challenge, citizenship, civics, Civil War, conflict, conservatism, constitution, critical judgment, Enlightenment, Ideology, Judicial Review, justice, progressive politics, Rationality, Secularity, Separation of Powers, Supreme Court, Uncategorized
I originally intended to publish a column on the 1803 Supreme Court decision Marbury v. Madison last week, 22 November. In fact, I had the column finished, edited, and scheduled when Diane read what I had written and suggested that, instead of publishing the Marbury column then, that perhaps I should preface the Marbury column with a much more autobiographical “Skeptic’s Collection” column (1) narrating how I had become interested in that landmark case in order to (2) give some context for the Marbury column itself, and then (3)  subsequently publish the Marbury column the Thursday after – as it turns out, 6 December. Diane’s suggestion was very astute. So the following is a kind of intellectual autobiography of my very-much-ongoing love affair with Marbury v. Madison. Quixotic as it n
“To Beat The Morning Drum” — A Memorial Day Reflection

“To Beat The Morning Drum” — A Memorial Day Reflection

awareness, Challenge, Change, citizenship, civics, conflict, constitution, courage, critical judgment, D-Day, Discernment, election year, faithfulness, Fascism, Freedom, Gratitude, in memory of, Legacy, Memorial Day, Military, peace and justice, soldiers, Thanksgiving, Uncategorized, World War 2
Monday of next week, 28 May, is Memorial Day. So the following is dedicated to those who fought in the Nation's wars, especially those who never returned home. In particular, and most personally, I dedicate this to the memory of my father, Cpl. Leonard Eugene Cowles, who served in Battery C of the 174th Field Artillery Battalion, and of whom I have written previously. The following poem by Walt Whitman was reprinted on the flyleaf of Dad's copy of We Did, the history of the 174th which was issued to every member of the Battalion as they left the Service at the end of World War II. (The title of the history was chosen so as to finish the Battalion motto:  Possumus Et Volumus -- "We Can And We Will".) How painfully nostalgic to reflect that the men who received that Battalion history wen