Saturday, August 15
Shadow

Tag: aging

Mindful Monday: The end of nothing

Mindful Monday: The end of nothing

Buddhism, mindfulness, Spirituality
"It's not so bad to find yourself free of the effort to overcome your life. It's not so bad. I came to the garden just in time to enter the age of undoing. Surprisingly, it's the age where the most amazing transformations take place. Every single leaf drops every single year from a sycamore, and it is the end of nothing... I learned that all my faith lies in the path of least resistance -- in the humble power and aching grace of letting go." -- Karen Maezen Miller What are you noticing about taking the path of least resistance? ... for Mindful Monday Source: Miller, Karen Maezen. Paradise in Plain Sight: Lessons from a Zen Garden. Novato, CA: New World Library, 2014, pp. 131-32. Photo credit: "Redhill Wildlife Centre - Jan 2008 - Sycamore at Sunset," Gareth Williams, 2008.

Over His Morning Coffee

Joy, Spirituality
Over his morning coffee, he sat dreaming of yesterday's spring and the hill country of his youth, remembering summers of peace and autumn days when he still thought life a forever thing. The world lay before him then, a ripe field awaiting harvest. Now beside this sad cup, a winter hand, so withered and so gray, an old man's hand he barely recognized as his own. Then his gaze found her playful smile. In the hazel warmth of her eyes he felt like spring again, the rich loam of her love yielding a gentle harvest of joy The present moment is filled with joy and happiness. If you are attentive, you will see it. Thích Nhất Hạnh, Peace Is Every Step: The Path of Mindfulness in Everyday Life © 2015, poem, Jamie Dedes (The Poet by Day), all rights reserved; 2012, photograph, Wendy Rose Alger Begu...

A Business of the Heart

Joy, Spirituality
The Spoon Theory (view the video above) is a clear and vivid way of explaining what it is like to live with any chronic, catastrophic and potentially life-threatening illness. I suspect that it is also explains what life is like for those who have lived long enough to be described as "elderly." The first step in living successfully with catastrophic illness and advanced aging is to recognize (acknowledge/understand) the ramifications in terms of everyday life and its details. The Spoon Theory helps with that. The second step is acceptance. That's about letting go of your story. It's about not being defined by the circumstances of your life. It's about living with not struggling against. This requires something much more profound than positive thinking, which does offer some help but only ...