Tag: abortion

Hamburger And Handel, Porterhouse And Picasso

Hamburger And Handel, Porterhouse And Picasso

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I want to solicit the help of – as strange as this is going to sound, coming from me – conservative, pro-life / anti-abortion, evangelical Christians in understanding something that has happened to me multiple times in debates about abortion. By “multiple times,” I mean so often that I have come to expect some cognate of this pattern to recur as a matter of course. As you might expect, the whole debate turns on the issue of the “ontological” status of the fetus in the mother’s womb:  is the fetus a human person or not, and if the fetus is human, when in the pregnancy does the fetus attain this status of person-hood? As I have said elsewhere, I have no idea what the answer to the above italicized question is, and my entire stance of being pro-choice is predicated on my ignorance a
Tuesday’s Artful Response: Ethic of Life

Tuesday’s Artful Response: Ethic of Life

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I am not sure today's response is "artful" in that I have not done an art project, but it is in response to what my friend James wrote on Thursday. So first, I'll start with a haiku: the first seed dropsconstitutes, forms, lives, and diesbeginning again It was very tempting to put "beguine-ing again". However, I want to respond to this: "Conclusion:  a religiously grounded anti-abortion ideology is a dead letter." James Cowles I totally agree. You can't get to anti-abortion ideology without disregarding God's own abortion plan. In Numbers 5:11-22, "The Test for an Unfaithful Wife," verses 16-18 are about the "water of bitterness" that brings on "the curse." And, the priests, no less, were the people who prescribed the abortion. Socially, I bet it was a lot easier to cause
Digital Responses To An Analog Issue — The Most Basic Fallacy In The Abortion Debate

Digital Responses To An Analog Issue — The Most Basic Fallacy In The Abortion Debate

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I have recently written elsewhere about the ontological and epistemological problems surrounding the current debate about abortion. These problems – almost always unacknowledged and even unconscious – plague both sides of the abortion debate, pro-choice no less than pro-life. But, in the process of reflecting on that “Skeptic’s” column and responding to reactions thereto, I have concluded that that earlier column did not really address the most fundamental problem with the current abortion debate:  the difference – again, for the pro-choice position no less than its pro-life counterpart – goes even deeper than the disagreements I mentioned in that earlier column. In fact, so I would argue now, that most fundamental difference is not, at base, even religious or metaphysical or ph