war

D-Day and My Dad

D-Day and My Dad

citizenship, conflict, courage, culture, D-Day, death, Ethics, Fear, Freedom, Guns, in memory of, peace and justice, remembrance, service, soldiers, sorrow, Uncategorized, veterans, violence, war, world, World War 2
I am re-publishing this column in observance of Veterans' Day, and in honor of my Dad, a veteran of World War II and D-Day. They must never be forgotten, especially now that fascism, the very plague my dad and his comrades fought and bled to exterminate, is gaining power in Europe and even in the United States. "For at any price, we must keep those who have too clear a conscience from living and dying in peace." -- E. M. Cioran, "Thinking Against Oneself" in The Temptation to Exist Given how short Americans’ collective historical memory has become, many people – and it may be all “millennials” – would be hard-pressed to attach any significance to today: 6 June 2017. But before someone cues up the theme music from “Final Jeopardy”, please allow me to enlighten you:   as of today, it has
Reflections on September 11 … Seventeen Years Later

Reflections on September 11 … Seventeen Years Later

"Life" Issues, 9-11, Atheism, autonomy, awareness, Change, Christianity, conservatism, culture, Enlightenment, faith, Four Quartets, God, Holy Mystery, Islam, Kingdom of God, memories, monotheism, Numinous, postmodernism, Religion, sadness, Shanksville, Spirituality, terrorism, The Divine, Uncategorized, United 93, violence, war, World Trade Center
As of today, it has been 17 years since two Boeing colleagues, whom I will call Roger and Ted, and I traveled on Boeing business to Salt Lake City to spend a few days working at the small Boeing engineering office there.  We had flown in the previous day, 10 September, and spent that day walking around the city, four-wheeling around the rough terrain surrounding the Lake, taking a hair-raising drive up into the front range of the Wasatch Mountains, visiting the Mormon Tabernacle, and strolling around Park City, before going to dinner at a local steak house. Next morning, 11 September, I turned on the TV in my room to watch the news as I got dressed. I was mildly surprised at being greeted by what appeared to be a picture of the World Trade Center towers burning. I say only “mildly surp
Mindful Monday: Ignorance is the enemy

Mindful Monday: Ignorance is the enemy

awareness, Buddhism, mindfulness, peace, war
Certainly, decisions about war and peace are made by people, people we could name-and blame-as culprits. I wonder, though, if we are not best served by naming ignorance as the enemy to be defeated, even as we act firmly to oppose what we see as wrongdoing in the world, what we recognize as causing pain. This would leave us without human enemies, with only confused people needing help. --Sylvia Boorstein What are you noticing about the impetus to condemn those who act in a detestable, even criminal manner? (This notion is a challenge for me in the wake of the Charlottesville riot and terrorist attack.) ... for Mindful Monday ... Source: "There Is No Blame," Lion's Roar, 1/26/16 issue Photo credit: "no enemy," Heidi De Vries, 2005. Curated by Donna Pierce