T. S. Eliot

“Not With A Bang But A Whimper” — The Glamp Of The Saints

“Not With A Bang But A Whimper” — The Glamp Of The Saints

Abrahamic Traditions, activism, autonomy, awareness, bible, bigotry, book review, Challenge, Change, Character of God, Christianity, Church, citizenship, conflict, conservatism, constitution, contemplation, courage, Creation, critical judgment, culture, Current Events, Discernment, election year, Enlightenment, Fascism, Fear, Food, hate, Hospitality, Human Condition, hunger, Ideology, immigration, injustice, Jean Raspail, Minorities, multiculturalism, Nihilism, Pain and Suffering, postmodernism, progressive politics, racism, Refugee's, Religion, resentment, Secularity, T. S. Eliot, The Camp of the Saints, Tolerance, Trump, Uncategorized, violence, Welcoming the other
Glamping ... And when the thousand years are ended, Satan will be released from his prison, and will go out to deceive the nations which are in the four corners of the earth, Gog and Magog, and will gather them together for the battle; the number of whom is as the sand of the sea. And they went up over the breadth of the earth and encompassed the camp of the saints, and the beloved city. -- Revelation chapter 20:7-9a It is unfortunate that the most prescient book ever written about the present mass migration of immigrants from the Third World to the First, especially to the US from Mexico and Central America and to Europe from the Levant, is out of print and therefore unavailable:  Jean Raspail’s eerily prophetic The Camp of the Saints (hereafter Camp).  (The Amazon link says simply t
Reading As Companionship — A Personal History

Reading As Companionship — A Personal History

"Life" Issues, Abrahamic Traditions, Albert Camus, Archetypes, Ash Wednesday, At-One-Ment, Atheism, awareness, C. S. Lewis, Challenge, Change, Christianity, Christianity/Catholicism, Church, Comfort, community, Compassion, conflict, contemplation, courage, Creator, creator senses, critical judgment, culture, curiosity, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Discernment, doubt, Education, Enlightenment, existentialism, Ezra Pound, faith, Four Quartets, God, Holy Mystery, Hope, Human Condition, Imagination, Intelligence, Jim Cowles, Lent/Ash Wednesday, Literature, Longing, Mystery, Myth, Mythology, Nihilism, Numinous, Philosophy, Poetry, Religion, Secularity, solidarity, T. S. Eliot, Uncategorized, Wholeness
In Shadowlands, the movie about the courtship and marriage of C. S. Lewis and Joy Davidman Gresham, C. S. Lewis is quoted as saying “We read to know we are not alone”.  I have found multitudes of citations  where people quote Lewis as having said this in those very words, but have so far found no specific source, no book, no article, no lecture, for this remark. But even if Lewis did not say it, he should have.  For in my own personal experience, there have been instances too abundant to count where this proved to be the case with uncanny timeliness.  The following examples do not even scratch the surface. But in virtually all cases of where I have been reminded that I am not alone, this reminder also amounted to a revelation of what I myself thought even at times when I was not aware
Treason, Treachery, And The Trauma Of Trust

Treason, Treachery, And The Trauma Of Trust

"Life" Issues, Abrahamic Traditions, affirmation/s, Atheism, autonomy, awareness, betrayal, Challenge, Change, Character of God, Christian Church, Christianity, Church, community, Compassion, conflict, conservatism, courage, covenant, critical judgment, Discernment, doubt, Downton Abbey, Edward VIII / Duke of Windsor, empathy, Ethics, existentialism, faith, God, Julian of Norwich, Lewis, Patheos, Queen Elizabeth, Rationality, Religion, Scripture, Secularity, Spirituality, T. S. Eliot, Theodicy, Theology, Uncategorized
In a recent “Skeptic’s Collection” column, I used the “Vergangenheit” episode of the critically acclaimed Netflix series The Crown as a springboard to a broader discussion of the relationship, within the Christian tradition, of forgiveness and trust. Implicit in my discussion was a critique of the conception of this relationship among, not all, but broad segments of the progressive-Christian community, which seems to often believe that the two are, if not strictly synonymous, then at least closely related. I argued to the contrary:  that trust is always, at best, conditional, even on those occasions when forgiveness is absolutely required. My question is this:  if we transpose that transaction between the Queen and the former King (now Duke) from a human to a theological key, is the Qu