Prayer Practice

Tuesday’s Temptation: Acceptance

Tuesday’s Temptation: Acceptance

"Life" Issues, activism, prayer, Prayer Practice
Acceptance is a fine line to walk.  One has to accept what is while working towards changing the world to be more merciful and just.  It is a paradox--acceptance and change.  I come to these thoughts after the ragged theology of Jefferson Sessions was used to justify taking children away from their parents.  It is so easy to be overwhelmed be media in this circumstance.  To just accept what seems, to me, to be indescribable evil.  Seeing the photos of children crying.  Hearing the stories of heartbreak. Being overwhelmed on a daily basis leads to inaction which leads to a perverted acceptance of a new status quo of horror. This is not okay.  We cannot give in.  We cannot accept.  We must offer change. Now, how do we do that?  That is the next task!  Thinking of strategies that cre
Tuesday’s Temptation: Cutting-Off

Tuesday’s Temptation: Cutting-Off

bigotry, prayer, Prayer Practice
There is a way of making a family tree that includes tracking medical, relationship, and personal noticings.  It is called a genogram.  What I found really interesting when I did a relationship genogram for my family is that there are generational patterns of cutting-off.  What this means is that rather than resolve conflict, people simply cut one another off and stop talking. I find myself fighting that temptation every day.  I am so angry and hurt that people that say they love me and my family, my beautiful LGBTQIA family, would vote for someone who actively articulated harm against us.  I am saddened that someone would choose their personal pocket book over the safety of women and children.  I am disgusted that personal values mean so little that the temptation of more personal prof
Tuesday’s Temptation: Fake Joy

Tuesday’s Temptation: Fake Joy

Grief, prayer, Prayer Practice
This may be a peculiarly western temptation: Move through grief, fast, so you can claim joy. But I would contend that it is a fake joy when you don't go through the angsty, agitating, worrisome moments of grief. By now, most of us are familiar with Elisabeth Kubler Ross's five stages of grief. David Kessler writes: I was privileged to co-author two books with the legendary, Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, as well as adapt her well-respected stages of dying for those in grief. As expected, the stages would present themselves differently in grief. In our book, On Grief and Grieving we present the adapted stages in the much needed area of grief. The stages have evolved since their introduction and have been very misunderstood over the past four decades. They were never meant to help tuck messy em