Pain and Suffering

Jumping The Abortion Shark

Jumping The Abortion Shark

"Life" Issues, Abortion, activism, autonomy, awareness, Challenge, Change, Christianity, citizenship, civics, conflict, conservatism, contraception, critical judgment, culture, doubt, entering into suffering, epistemology, First Amendment, Freedom, God, Ideology, justice, life, Ontology, Pain and Suffering, Philosophy, political rhetoric, progressive politics, Rationality, Religion, Science, Secularity, Sexuality, Suffering, Supreme Court, Theology, Uncategorized, Women
I have been closely following the history of the hyper-restrictive – grossly over-restrictive, in my estimation – abortion laws and bills, including the so-called “heartbeat” laws / bills. As a result, I have become convinced that the biggest problem with the abortion debate – both pro-choice and pro-life -- is that both parties assume they know one helluva lot more than they actually do, in fact, one helluva lot more than anybody knows about what a fetus in a womb actually is, “ontologically”. In fact, both parties assume that they know one helluva lot more than anyone can know, even in principle. First, we need to define some terminology.  Consider the word “phenotype”. “Phenotype” refers to those characteristics of a biological organism that are naked-eye, empirically,
“Not With A Bang But A Whimper” — The Glamp Of The Saints

“Not With A Bang But A Whimper” — The Glamp Of The Saints

Abrahamic Traditions, activism, autonomy, awareness, bible, bigotry, book review, Challenge, Change, Character of God, Christianity, Church, citizenship, conflict, conservatism, constitution, contemplation, courage, Creation, critical judgment, culture, Current Events, Discernment, election year, Enlightenment, Fascism, Fear, Food, hate, Hospitality, Human Condition, hunger, Ideology, immigration, injustice, Jean Raspail, Minorities, multiculturalism, Nihilism, Pain and Suffering, postmodernism, progressive politics, racism, Refugee's, Religion, resentment, Secularity, T. S. Eliot, The Camp of the Saints, Tolerance, Trump, Uncategorized, violence, Welcoming the other
Glamping ... And when the thousand years are ended, Satan will be released from his prison, and will go out to deceive the nations which are in the four corners of the earth, Gog and Magog, and will gather them together for the battle; the number of whom is as the sand of the sea. And they went up over the breadth of the earth and encompassed the camp of the saints, and the beloved city. -- Revelation chapter 20:7-9a It is unfortunate that the most prescient book ever written about the present mass migration of immigrants from the Third World to the First, especially to the US from Mexico and Central America and to Europe from the Levant, is out of print and therefore unavailable:  Jean Raspail’s eerily prophetic The Camp of the Saints (hereafter Camp).  (The Amazon link says simply t
Saints, Sultans, And Submission:  The Tyranny Of Interpretation

Saints, Sultans, And Submission: The Tyranny Of Interpretation

"Life" Issues, Abrahamic Traditions, activism, Anchorite, autonomy, awareness, body, Challenge, Change, Character of God, Cherry picking, Christian Church, Christianity, Christianity/Catholicism, Church, community, Compassion, conflict, conservatism, contemplation, Creator, critical judgment, Crusades, culture, Discernment, entering into suffering, Ethics, faith, faithfulness, Fasting, God, Human Condition, Islam, Kingdom of God, Letting go, Military, monotheism, mosques, Pain and Suffering, peace and justice, Quran, reconciliation, Religious War, Spirituality, theocracy, Theology, Uncategorized
On Thursday, 1 February 2018, Jamie Dedes honored me by publishing my review of the new book by Paul Moses, The Saint and the Sultan:  The Crusades, Islam, and Francis of Assisi’s Mission of Peace. I found the book engrossing. In fact, even its omissions were engrossing. And Moses' entire text was provocative, touching issues on history, ethics, religion, and the psychology thereof. In fact, Paul Moses' book was too good to keep. So -- with Jamie's permission -- I am taking the liberty of reprinting my review here. For a religious person who is “seeking God’s will,” the most reliable indicator that you are in serious trouble is the belief that you have found it. Paul Moses has, perhaps unintentionally, written a brief but fascinating account of a case in point:  The Saint and the Su