Mythology

A Euron Sample For Westeros … (No That’s Not A Typo)

Anticipation, autonomy, awareness, betrayal, Challenge, Change, Civil War, conflict, courage, critical judgment, culture, Current Events, Discernment, Ethics, fables, faith, faithfulness, Fire And Ice, Game Of Thrones, hate, history, Human Condition, humor, Ideology, Imagination, justice, Literature, Mythology, Politics, Religion, Religious War, Uncategorized
Like most everyone else – that is, except probably for the actual actors and staff of Game of Thrones (hereafter GOT) – I have only watched the penultimate episode “The Bells”. So I know no more about how the series ends than anyone else. Least of all do I know who ends up sitting on the Iron Throne. That question presumably is answered in the final-season episode next week, as this is written (14 May). But if the Westerosi elite were to ask my counsel about who is best suited and equipped to sit on the Throne, I could recur to some ancient Greek texts, specifically Plato’s Republic, for some very wise advice. But first a solemn warning:  If you have not seen this next-to-last episode of GOT, then read no farther, because reading past this paragraph will almost certainly
Reading As Companionship — A Personal History

Reading As Companionship — A Personal History

"Life" Issues, Abrahamic Traditions, Albert Camus, Archetypes, Ash Wednesday, At-One-Ment, Atheism, awareness, C. S. Lewis, Challenge, Change, Christianity, Christianity/Catholicism, Church, Comfort, community, Compassion, conflict, contemplation, courage, Creator, creator senses, critical judgment, culture, curiosity, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Discernment, doubt, Education, Enlightenment, existentialism, Ezra Pound, faith, Four Quartets, God, Holy Mystery, Hope, Human Condition, Imagination, Intelligence, Jim Cowles, Lent/Ash Wednesday, Literature, Longing, Mystery, Myth, Mythology, Nihilism, Numinous, Philosophy, Poetry, Religion, Secularity, solidarity, T. S. Eliot, Uncategorized, Wholeness
In Shadowlands, the movie about the courtship and marriage of C. S. Lewis and Joy Davidman Gresham, C. S. Lewis is quoted as saying “We read to know we are not alone”.  I have found multitudes of citations  where people quote Lewis as having said this in those very words, but have so far found no specific source, no book, no article, no lecture, for this remark. But even if Lewis did not say it, he should have.  For in my own personal experience, there have been instances too abundant to count where this proved to be the case with uncanny timeliness.  The following examples do not even scratch the surface. But in virtually all cases of where I have been reminded that I am not alone, this reminder also amounted to a revelation of what I myself thought even at times when I was not aware
Catechizing Billy Graham

Catechizing Billy Graham

"Life" Issues, anger, awareness, bigotry, Challenge, Change, Character of God, Christianity, citizenship, civics, community, conflict, conservatism, constitution, courage, Criminal Procedure, critical judgment, culture, Discernment, doubt, Edward VIII / Duke of Windsor, election year, Ethics, Evangelicalism, Evidence, faith, faithfulness, Fascism, Fear, forgiveness, Forgiveness, Fundamentalism, God, hate, Ideology, Jesus, justice, Letting go, Myth, Mythology, Oswald Mosley, Philosophy, Politics, Presidency, progressive politics, Queen Elizabeth, Rationality, reconciliation, reflection, Religion, republic, resentment, Resistance, Scripture, Secularity, Skeptic, Theology, Trump, Uncategorized, Word of God
The “Vergangenheit” episode of season 2 of Netflix’ critically acclaimed series The Crown dwelt at length on the treachery of the ex-King Edward VIII’s and his wife Wallis Simpson’s collaboration with Hitler to restore Edward to the Throne following the supposedly imminent and, at the time, the all-too-possible fall of England and the establishment of a Nazi regime in the United Kingdom. (Incidentally and not unexpectedly, the Prime Minister of a fascist UK would allegedly have been Oswald Mosley, head of the British Union of Fascists.) The true extent of the treason came to light with the publication, in the United States, of what Americans called the “Marburg files,” after the castle in the German state of Hesse, where the documents were discovered – which the English more appropriat