Intention

Wholly Missing the Whole of the Holy

Wholly Missing the Whole of the Holy

Abrahamic Traditions, Anchorite, Archetypes, awareness, Buddhism, C. S. Lewis, Change, Christianity, Comfort, contemplation, Creation, Ecumenism, Epiphany, epistemology, faith, Four Quartets, God, Grace, Holy Mystery, inner peace, inspiration, Intention, Jesus, Julian of Norwich, Literature, Liturgy, Longing, meditation, meditation with music, mindfulness, monotheism, music, Mystery, Numinous, Present Moment, Religion, Renewal, spiritual growth, spiritual practice, T. S. Eliot, Taoism, The Divine, Theology, Uncategorized, Universe
This will probably sound strange coming from me.  But … here goes … I miss God. Well … even that is not quite accurate.  If by the term “God” you understand the traditional, orthodox conception of God as basically “a really, really, really big Person writ large,” then … no … I do not miss that God, the kind of God Samuel Taylor Coleridge, somewhere or other, referred to when he said that the average Englishman’s conception of God is as “of an immense Clergyman”; the kind of God Whose eye is on the sparrow; the kind of God Who numbers the very hairs of my head (in my case, a task easy even for human beings, let alone God); the God Who browbeat poor, innocent Job. In other words, I do not miss the kind of God who Sees Things And Runs Things, the Great Cosmic National Security Agency,
Lights in the Darkness

Lights in the Darkness

At-One-Ment, awareness, inner peace, Intention, joy of returning, Labyrinth, Prayer Practice, spiritual practice
The Labyrinth of Light is a winter solstice celebration in Vancouver, British Columbia. Even though we're approaching the summer solstice, not the winter one, I found this picture haunting. Apparently the labyrinth was created with over 700 candles made of pure beeswax. One of my favorite spiritual practices is walking a labyrinth. I haven't been able to do it in several years, but I remember the feeling of following a path that looks like it's going nowhere, but knowing there was a destination. My feet and my heart drew me ever closer to the center. Unlike a maze where you lose your way, the labyrinth is a spiritual tool that can help you find your way. It's a walking meditation and a path of prayer.  It's a time to contemplate, to focus deeply, to reflect on who you are and on God.
Tomorrow You’ll Be Brave – Prayerful Tuesday

Tomorrow You’ll Be Brave – Prayerful Tuesday

Anticipation, autonomy, Change, courage, curiosity, doubt, Failing, faith, Fear, Gratitude, Holy Mystery, Intention, journey, Lectio Divina, listen, meditation, mindfulness, prayer, Prayer Practice, Risks, Rumi, spiritual practice, Spirituality, Sufi, trust, Voice of the Divine
Tomorrow you'll be brave, you say? Fool! Dive today From the cliff of what you know into what you can't know. You fear the rocks? Better men than you have died on them; Dying on Love's rocks is nobler than a life of death. - Jalal-ud-Din Rumi (Translated by Andrew Harvey from A Year of Rumi, Daily OM, May 7, 2016 ) It is always “tomorrow” for me, I always want to put off taking that risk until tomorrow.  Maybe that is why this saying of Rumi’s means so much to me that I want to share it with you.  This week I am offering Rumi’s saying for meditation with Lectio Divina. Place yourself in a comfortable position and allow yourself to become silent. Focus for a few moments on your breathing; or use a “prayer word” or “prayer phrase" as you gently and gradually center your