immigration

Poetry as Spiritual Practice

Creativity, immigration, poem, poems, Poetry, poetry reading, praying with poetry, spiritual practice, spiritual practices
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ioPbgNGV8zA I've been having fun exploring the world of poetry. I never thought of writing or reading poetry to be a form of spiritual practice. But when Terri Stewart asked if I wanted to join her in her New Year's resolution to read one poem every day, I found that's exactly what was happening. I'm in two different groups right now who use prompts to encourage the writing of poetry. Reading and writing poetry is bringing me closer to a God who I need right now more than ever. Today I'm going to share a poem by Amena Brown that might do the same thing for you as it did for me. I don't know what God will give me this week, but I know it will be something to bring me into the presence of God.
Bull-Sh** And The Bully Pulpit

Bull-Sh** And The Bully Pulpit

14th Amendment, 5th Amendment, 8th Amendment, activism, anger, autonomy, awareness, Challenge, Change, citizenship, civics, conflict, conservatism, constitution, critical judgment, culture, Current Events, Discernment, Education, Enlightenment, Ethics, Executive Order, Fascism, First Amendment, Fourteenth Amendment, Freedom, Ideology, immigration, justice, law, Nihilism, political rhetoric, Politics, postmodernism, Presidency, progressive politics, Quasi-War, Rationality, republic, Secularity, social justice, Tolerance, Trump, Uncategorized, Xenophobia
Several times in the process of playing my role of “voice crying in the wilderness” against the plague of Trump and Trumpism, I have encountered relatively temperate and relatively reasonable Trump supporters who said that, no, they were revolted by Trump’s advocacy of violence against his critics, prejudice against Muslims, the muzzling of a free press, and his condoning of sexual assault, because, yes, they recognized the reality of offenses in all those areas against personal dignity and constitutional liberty. But … you could hear the thundering hoofbeats of the "But" all the way across the Galaxy … Trump did advocate several policies they supported. And, besides, they concluded, the Presidency was, by the design of the Framers, a pretty weak office, anyway, in fact, more or less a
Horst Wessel Meets The Three Stooges

Horst Wessel Meets The Three Stooges

activism, anger, autonomy, awareness, bigotry, Challenge, citizenship, civics, Civil War, Compassion, conflict, conservatism, constitution, courage, critical judgment, culture, Current Events, Discernment, Equality, faithfulness, Fascism, Fear, Fearless, First Amendment, Freedom, Fundamentalism, hate, Ideology, immigration, injustice, justice, law, Minorities, Muslims, Nihilism, Pain and Suffering, Presidency, race, racism, Rationality, Secularity, social justice, terrorism, Tragedy, Trump, Uncategorized, VA, violence
I am learning – the hard way – to get knee-jerkingly suspicious every time someone mentions the phrase “moral equivalency” – and certainly when anyone attempts to employ moral equivalency in arguments. I suppose there are occasions when that term, and that rhetorical tactic, are justified, but I have not encountered any examples lately, least of all examples in real life. In fact, I would even make bold to say that at least 90% of the time – and I mean for that number to be interpreted quite literally – entities and acts that are said to be “morally equivalent” are anything but.  Most of the time “morally equivalency” could be more accurately rephrased as “moral imbecility”.  Two examples leap to mine immediately. President Trump – two words that make about as much sense when us