Fear

“Not With A Bang But A Whimper” — The Glamp Of The Saints

“Not With A Bang But A Whimper” — The Glamp Of The Saints

Abrahamic Traditions, activism, autonomy, awareness, bible, bigotry, book review, Challenge, Change, Character of God, Christianity, Church, citizenship, conflict, conservatism, constitution, contemplation, courage, Creation, critical judgment, culture, Current Events, Discernment, election year, Enlightenment, Fascism, Fear, Food, hate, Hospitality, Human Condition, hunger, Ideology, immigration, injustice, Jean Raspail, Minorities, multiculturalism, Nihilism, Pain and Suffering, postmodernism, progressive politics, racism, Refugee's, Religion, resentment, Secularity, T. S. Eliot, The Camp of the Saints, Tolerance, Trump, Uncategorized, violence, Welcoming the other
Glamping ... And when the thousand years are ended, Satan will be released from his prison, and will go out to deceive the nations which are in the four corners of the earth, Gog and Magog, and will gather them together for the battle; the number of whom is as the sand of the sea. And they went up over the breadth of the earth and encompassed the camp of the saints, and the beloved city. -- Revelation chapter 20:7-9a It is unfortunate that the most prescient book ever written about the present mass migration of immigrants from the Third World to the First, especially to the US from Mexico and Central America and to Europe from the Levant, is out of print and therefore unavailable:  Jean Raspail’s eerily prophetic The Camp of the Saints (hereafter Camp).  (The Amazon link says simply t
Jumping The Brexit Shark

Jumping The Brexit Shark

"Life" Issues, activism, autonomy, awareness, betrayal, bigotry, Brexit, Change, citizenship, civics, community, conflict, conservatism, critical judgment, culture, Current Events, Economy, Equality, EU, Fear, hate, history, Ideology, inclusive, Islam, movement, multiculturalism, Muslims, political rhetoric, polyvocality, postmodernism, racism, Religion, Secularity, social justice, Tolerance, Uncategorized, Welcoming the other
For the last several weeks, I have been following the news out of the UK about the Parliament’s vote on PM Theresa May’s foredoomed plan for Brexit, including one installment of “Prime Minister’s questions,” which, for obvious reasons, centered on the still-falling debris from the May government’s unprecedented 230-vote blow-up of Mrs. May's Brexit deal. It had all the tragic dignity of, say, Sophocles’ Oedipus trilogy:  you know what is going to happen, but for that very reason, you simply cannot bring yourself to avert your gaze. I was all the more horrified because, knowing the Parliament vote was imminent and that it would be followed by the 29 March deadline imposed by Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty, I had begun some weeks before to read about the European Union (EU), Brexit, and
Preaching To The Un-Choir

Preaching To The Un-Choir

activism, autonomy, awareness, bigotry, Challenge, Change, Christianity, Church, citizenship, civics, community, conflict, conservatism, constitution, courage, critical judgment, culture, Current Events, Discernment, doubt, Enlightenment, epistemology, Equality, Evidence, faithfulness, Fascism, Fear, Fundamentalism, history, Ideology, injustice, law, Lyotard, Nihilism, Politics, postmodernism, Secularity, Uncategorized
In 2007, Harvard University Press published a remarkable book by Yale professor Bruce Ackerman, The Failure of the Founding Fathers (hereafter Failure). Best I remember, I read the book because I was startled by the sacrilegiousness of the title:  Ackerman was violating the cultural canons mandating unqualified awe of the Founders and Framers by suggesting that, in writing the Constitution, they had failed in some way. (To say that the Framers failed because they compromised with the slave States to get the Constitution ratified is a truism. Ackerman had something else in mind, however.) He convinced me, though I persist in believing that the “perfect storm” of synergistic malfunctions that very nearly deadlocked the election of 1800, and that almost led to the dissolution of the Union