entering into suffering

Saints, Sultans, And Submission:  The Tyranny Of Interpretation

Saints, Sultans, And Submission: The Tyranny Of Interpretation

"Life" Issues, Abrahamic Traditions, activism, Anchorite, autonomy, awareness, body, Challenge, Change, Character of God, Cherry picking, Christian Church, Christianity, Christianity/Catholicism, Church, community, Compassion, conflict, conservatism, contemplation, Creator, critical judgment, Crusades, culture, Discernment, entering into suffering, Ethics, faith, faithfulness, Fasting, God, Human Condition, Islam, Kingdom of God, Letting go, Military, monotheism, mosques, Pain and Suffering, peace and justice, Quran, reconciliation, Religious War, Spirituality, theocracy, Theology, Uncategorized
On Thursday, 1 February 2018, Jamie Dedes honored me by publishing my review of the new book by Paul Moses, The Saint and the Sultan:  The Crusades, Islam, and Francis of Assisi’s Mission of Peace. I found the book engrossing. In fact, even its omissions were engrossing. And Moses' entire text was provocative, touching issues on history, ethics, religion, and the psychology thereof. In fact, Paul Moses' book was too good to keep. So -- with Jamie's permission -- I am taking the liberty of reprinting my review here. For a religious person who is “seeking God’s will,” the most reliable indicator that you are in serious trouble is the belief that you have found it. Paul Moses has, perhaps unintentionally, written a brief but fascinating account of a case in point:  The Saint and the Su
The Fellowship Of Disillusionment — Philip Yancey’s “Disappointment With God”

The Fellowship Of Disillusionment — Philip Yancey’s “Disappointment With God”

"Life" Issues, Abrahamic Traditions, Astronomy, awareness, Broken Heart, Character of God, Cherry picking, Christianity, Church, community, Compassion, critical judgment, culture, Discernment, doubt, entering into suffering, Epiphany, epistemology, existentialism, faith, God, Human Condition, Letting go, meditation, meditation with music, mindfulness, monotheism, Ockham's Razor, Randomness, Rationality, Religion, Science, Secularity, Spirituality, Theodicy, Theology, Uncategorized
I never write book reviews ... until now. Now I am making an exception for three reasons:  (1) Philip Yancey's book Disappointment with God is an unflinching appraisal of how long-term disappointment precipitates crises of faith in the life of religiously devout people, (2) the theodical implications of that process, and (3) the theological consequences of (1) and (2). If you have been reading these columns for the last few years, you know that this has been a strong preoccupation of mine. But even though I wrote an Amazon review of Disappointment with God, I was not writing these "Skeptic's" columns at the time. So the following is in the nature of the latter playing catch-up with the former. ****************************** The Christian community almost always deals with disappointm
The Hazards Of Defending The Indefensible

The Hazards Of Defending The Indefensible

Abrahamic Traditions, Archetypes, Buddhism, Challenge, Change, Character of God, Christianity/Catholicism, Church, community, Compassion, conflict, contemplation, covenant, Creation, Creator, critical judgment, culture, entering into suffering, epistemology, Ethics, faith, higher criticism, Human Condition, monotheism, parable, paradox, Problem of Evil, Rationality, Religion, Scripture, The Divine, Theodicy, Theology, Uncategorized
Over the years of studying and dealing with both the practitioners and the practice of theodicy, I have developed a pretty accurate set of antennae for detecting when even people of undisputed integrity and good will have gone “a bridge too far” in their zeal to “justify the ways of God to man” by defending conduct that, in other contexts, would be assessed as unambiguously criminal. In  such cases, God is allowed to breeze by despite conduct that would earn a human a war-crimes trial at The Hague. No devout monotheist is exempt from this risk, not even the most temperate, rational, and tolerant. Fr. Ron Rolheiser is a quintessentially temperate, rational, and tolerant man par excellence, both professionally and personally, as I can attest from having met him, spoken with him one-to-on