death

D-Day and My Dad

D-Day and My Dad

citizenship, conflict, courage, culture, D-Day, death, Ethics, Fear, Freedom, Guns, in memory of, peace and justice, remembrance, service, soldiers, sorrow, Uncategorized, veterans, violence, war, world, World War 2
I am re-publishing this column in observance of Veterans' Day, and in honor of my Dad, a veteran of World War II and D-Day. They must never be forgotten, especially now that fascism, the very plague my dad and his comrades fought and bled to exterminate, is gaining power in Europe and even in the United States. "For at any price, we must keep those who have too clear a conscience from living and dying in peace." -- E. M. Cioran, "Thinking Against Oneself" in The Temptation to Exist Given how short Americans’ collective historical memory has become, many people – and it may be all “millennials” – would be hard-pressed to attach any significance to today: 6 June 2017. But before someone cues up the theme music from “Final Jeopardy”, please allow me to enlighten you:   as of today, it has
Am I Really Gonna Have To Write About This Yet Again … ?

Am I Really Gonna Have To Write About This Yet Again … ?

14th Amendment, 5th Amendment, autonomy, awareness, bigotry, Challenge, Change, Child Abuse, Christianity, Church, citizenship, civics, conflict, conservatism, constitution, Criminal Procedure, critical judgment, culture, Current Events, death, Education, Equality, faithfulness, Fascism, First Amendment, history, Ideology, Incarceration, injustice, Judicial Review, Justice Clarence Thomas, Marbury v. Madison, Muslims, Patheos, Religion, Secularity, Uncategorized
… but I suppose the answer is “Yes, I will have to write on this subject again, just as I have before.” This time around, I am writing in response to what Patheos rather breathlessly describes as a "constitutional horror":  Justice Thomas' assertion that, the "establishment" clause notwithstanding, States still have the right to designate certain religious / denominations as "official". As usual, and as is customary with all matters religious when people are given a breadth of audience that far exceeds their depth of knowledge, the hysteria is altogether overblown and unnecessary, due to an absence of working knowledge about the history of the subject – in this case, the interpretation of the “establishment” clause of the First Amendment. The whole point of what follows is a matter