Cherry picking

Cherry Picking The New Testament

Cherry Picking The New Testament

Archetypes, Art, Atheism, autonomy, awareness, Challenge, Cherry picking, Christianity, conservatism, Creator, critical judgment, culture, Discernment, epistemology, fables, faith, God, Hebrew Scripture, Ideology, Jesus, Judaism, monotheism, Rationality, reflection, Scripture, Secularity, Skeptic, Theodicy, Theology, Trump, Uncategorized
When I was at Exeter College, Oxford, in 1988, one of the more unsettling things I learned in my classes on postmodernist interpretation theory, both the ones I took and the ones I taught, is what the seemingly prosaic act of reading (almost?) always entails. Unpacking that statement is a many-splendored thing, too complex to address here. Suffice to say that one of the more disillusioning aspects of the act of reading a text, any text, is that we always, almost always despite ourselves, read selectively even when we do not want to. Or think we do not want to. Cherry-picking reading with a usually unconscious confirmation bias is an almost constant aspect of reading. And I am tempted to remove the "almost" in that prior sentence. Usually, on some level (almost?) always unconscious, we ...
On Not Getting The Hang-Uv-It

On Not Getting The Hang-Uv-It

Atheism, autonomy, awareness, C. S. Lewis, Cherry picking, Christianity, conservatism, critical judgment, culture, Elie Wiesel, faith, God, Ideology, Judaism, Ockham's Razor, Rationality, Reformation, Religion, theocracy, Theodicy, Theology, Uncategorized
I realize now -- when it's 'way too late -- that I could never get the hang of Christianity. Full disclosure:  I was a practicing, observant, believing Christian for the first 55-plus years of my life:  the guy who never missed church, could be relied on to lead a Bible study, teach a class, chair (or just be a member of) a committee, etc.  You know the drill.  Bottom line:  as a Christian, I’ve made my chops. Probably many times over.  But I stopped perhaps a dozen years ago. Now … to clarify … the following is not intended to assert that every practice and every belief that follows is an essential part of Christianity. They’re not. Some are essential; others, subcultural. But they are of a piece with every part of the Christian subculture I’ve ever been personally involved with. S