At-One-Ment

Reading As Companionship — A Personal History

Reading As Companionship — A Personal History

"Life" Issues, Abrahamic Traditions, Albert Camus, Archetypes, Ash Wednesday, At-One-Ment, Atheism, awareness, C. S. Lewis, Challenge, Change, Christianity, Christianity/Catholicism, Church, Comfort, community, Compassion, conflict, contemplation, courage, Creator, creator senses, critical judgment, culture, curiosity, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Discernment, doubt, Education, Enlightenment, existentialism, Ezra Pound, faith, Four Quartets, God, Holy Mystery, Hope, Human Condition, Imagination, Intelligence, Jim Cowles, Lent/Ash Wednesday, Literature, Longing, Mystery, Myth, Mythology, Nihilism, Numinous, Philosophy, Poetry, Religion, Secularity, solidarity, T. S. Eliot, Uncategorized, Wholeness
In Shadowlands, the movie about the courtship and marriage of C. S. Lewis and Joy Davidman Gresham, C. S. Lewis is quoted as saying “We read to know we are not alone”.  I have found multitudes of citations  where people quote Lewis as having said this in those very words, but have so far found no specific source, no book, no article, no lecture, for this remark. But even if Lewis did not say it, he should have.  For in my own personal experience, there have been instances too abundant to count where this proved to be the case with uncanny timeliness.  The following examples do not even scratch the surface. But in virtually all cases of where I have been reminded that I am not alone, this reminder also amounted to a revelation of what I myself thought even at times when I was not aware
“Cosmic Consciousness”, “Born Again”, And John Chapter 3

“Cosmic Consciousness”, “Born Again”, And John Chapter 3

"Life" Issues, Abrahamic Traditions, Archetypes, At-One-Ment, awareness, Change, Christian Church, Christianity, Church, contemplation, Cosmology, critical judgment, culture, God, healing moment, Hebrew Scripture, Holy Mystery, Hope, Human Condition, Imagination, Jesus, Longing, meditation, mind, mindfulness, Mystery, Numinous, paradox, Present Moment, Religion, Scripture, spiritual growth, spiritual practice, The Divine, Uncategorized, vipassana
Most of the time, I think that people who live in Christian cultures – both Christians and non-Christians – would mightily profit from a moratorium on reading, commenting on, and preaching about certain biblical doctrines and ideas. Which doctrines and which ideas? The list is far too long to even list, much less annotate.  So instead, I will pick a specific example: being “born again”.  I make bold to assert that we would all be better off if, for perhaps a generation or so and per impossibile, Christians stopped talking about being “born again”. We – meaning “all inhabitants of a Christian-dominated culture” – think we know what the New Testament means by the phrase “born again”. We don’t. In fact, we have, at best, only the palest and most emaciated notion of what the term means, th
Ain’t Got A Prayer

Ain’t Got A Prayer

"Life" Issues, Abrahamic Traditions, Aquinas, At-One-Ment, Atheism, Broken Heart, Buddhism, Change, Christian Church, Christianity, Christianity/Catholicism, Church, Comfort, community, Compassion, conflict, contemplation, critical judgment, culture, Discernment, doubt, empathy, Episcopacy, epistemology, existentialism, faith, faithfulness, Healing, Hope, Ideology, inner peace, journey, Letting go, life, Liturgy, monotheism, Philosophy, prayer, Prayer Practice, Prayers of Petition, Rationality, Religion, Risks, Scripture, Secularity, spiritual growth, spiritual practice, Spirituality, Theology, Thinking, Uncategorized
If there were more Christians and Christian ministers like the Rev. Terri Stewart, there is a pretty good chance -- who knows for sure?  -- that I would still be one, too. And if there were more monotheists like Terri, it is a pretty safe bet that -- while there no guarantees -- I most likely would not, as I presently do, regard monotheistic religion as a malignant canker on the arse of human spirituality. (For the record:  I do have deep and abiding respect for non-theistic religions, e.g., Buddhism and Taoism, where One Big Guy does not run Everything.) We do have our differences, e.g., Terri is much more reluctant than I to offend people. But let's not quibble. Most of all, let's not quibble, given that Terri recently wrote and published what I regard as the most realistic, level-he