Anticipation

Cassandra’s Lament

Cassandra’s Lament

activism, Anticipation, autonomy, awareness, bigotry, Broken Heart, Challenge, Change, Christianity, citizenship, civics, community, Compassion, conflict, conservatism, constitution, courage, covenant, critical judgment, culture, Current Events, empathy, Ethics, Evidence, Executive Branch, Executive Order, Family, Fascism, Fourteenth Amendment, Freedom, Fundamentalism, Ideology, immigration, Incarceration, injustice, Jeff Sessions, justice, law, mindfulness, Minorities, Mythology, Nihilism, peace and justice, postmodernism, Presidency, progressive politics, racism, Refugee's, Resistance, Secularity, social justice, solidarity, Trump, Uncategorized, World War I
According to Greek mythology, Cassandra, daughter of King Priam and Queen Hecuba of Troy, spurned Apollo’s sexual advances and was cursed by the god with the gift of uttering prophecies (about the fall of Troy, the assassination of Agamemnon, etc.) which were unfailingly accurate ... but which no one ever believed. I can sympathize. If you read nothing else I write in my “Skeptic’s” columns, for your own sake please read this one. If you don’t have the time, then make the time. It really is that important: If you have children, especially little children, and if your finances and circumstances permit — which I fully realize they may not — if at all possible, leave, or seriously prepare to leave, the United States. And go where? I would suggest Canada (preferably) or New Zealand o
Hatching, History, And Hubris

Hatching, History, And Hubris

activism, Anticipation, awareness, bigotry, Biology, Calvinism, causality, Christian Church, Christianity, Christianity/Catholicism, Church, citizenship, civics, Climate Change, community, conflict, conservatism, courage, covenant, Creator, critical judgment, culture, Discernment, doubt, Education, Enlightenment, Environment, Evolution, Fascism, Freedom, God, Hillary Clinton, Ideology, image of God, invitation, political rhetoric, Politics, progressive politics, Rationality, Science, Scripture, Secularity, separation of Church and State, sexual assault, Sexuality, Tolerance, Trump, Uncategorized
As anyone knows who has read more than a half-dozen or so of these “Skeptic’s” columns over the years, especially those emphasizing some aspect of history, one of my all-time favorite quotes is by the German historian and philosopher of history G. W. F. Hegel:  “The only thing we learn from history is that we learn nothing from history,” an assertion no less true for being facially self-contradictory. A simpler, more colloquial, and less high-falutin’, way of saying the same thing is “Don’t count your chickens before they’re hatched”. Many of the comments, predictions, and prognostications being bandied about by the liberal / progressive community in advance of the 2018 mid-term elections sorely tempts me to conclude that, having lost the last presidential election, progressives have a
Scrooge, “A Christmas Carol”, And … Sorta-Kinda … Keeping Christ Out Of Christmas

Scrooge, “A Christmas Carol”, And … Sorta-Kinda … Keeping Christ Out Of Christmas

"Life" Issues, Abrahamic Traditions, Advent, Anticipation, awareness, Challenge, Change, Christ Child, Christianity, Christmas, Church, community, Compassion, Creator, critical judgment, culture, December, Discernment, forgiveness, God, Gospel of Luke, Holy Mystery, Human Condition, Ideology, Imagination, Jesus, Jung, Myth, Numinous, Pain and Suffering, Poverty, relationships, Religion, Scripture, Secularity, Spirituality, Theology, Uncategorized, Waiting, Wholeness
I suppose there are still people around here and there who complain about the creeping secularism of the Holidays and who in consequence admonish others to “keep Christ in Christmas”.  I well remember such exhortations from the time of my childhood, growing up in Wichita, KS. Such hortatory rituals were often accompanied by carols, religious services, and – I would argue, curiously enough – by a reading of Charles Dickens’ perennial A Christmas Carol. I say “curiously enough” because I have just finished reading Carol for the few-hundredth time and for the first time, I noticed the absence of Christ in Carol, except in a very "thin", allusive sense. Carol without Christ, or with Christ in the background of the background, is a much more universal, even “archetypal”, story of the awaken