14th Amendment

On Being Right the First Time

On Being Right the First Time

14th Amendment, Change, conservatism, Consitution, First Amendment, GLBT, Ideology, Marriage Equality, Religion, sexual orientation, Sexuality, Spirituality, Tolerance
It isn’t often that a writer gets to publish a retraction that says, essentially, “I was right the first time”. But this is one such occasion. I recently published a “Skeptic's Collection” post in which I expressed concern about what I viewed at the time as a possible infringement of the “free exercise” rights of the owners of the Sweet Cakes bakery. Citing personal religious objections, the owners of the bakery had refused to provide a wedding cake for a lesbian couple. The couple filed a complaint against Sweet Cakes, and my original understanding was that the bakery was fined for retaliating by publishing the couple’s private contact information, not for refusing to bake the cake. (Many of the privacy issues resulted from the fact that the complaint, once filed, becomes part of the publ
Oh God! We Won! What Do We Do Now?

Oh God! We Won! What Do We Do Now?

14th Amendment, Change, conflict, Consitution, First Amendment, GLBT, Minorities, sexual orientation, Spirituality, Supreme Court
In the wake of the recent Obergefell v. Hodges decision recognizing a national right for same-sex marriage (SSM), the question that now preoccupies us – supporters of marriage equality and opponents alike – is whether businesses that oppose SSM should be granted an exemption if their opposition is based on religious objections. What I have observed in following the debate on both marriage equality itself and State-level religious freedom restoration acts (RFRAs) is a super-abundance of heat and, often, very little light and dispassionate reflection. Given the passions aroused on both sides by the debate, this is probably to be expected. It need not turn out that way. Dare I suggest that those of us who agree with the Obergefell decision can afford some forbearance and magnanimity? We need