Wednesday, December 2
Shadow

Author: lana1967

Jesus Very Soon–Advent WOW

Spirituality
This was one of the most adorable things I saw this week, and I really wanted to share it with you all. Advent is one of those seasons that I don't know much about. I only know "1 advent songe," and that is "O Come, O Come, Emmanuel." I'm sure I've sung others, but I grew up in the Southern Baptist tradition and never attended one faith denomination consistently. My knowledge is about as extensive as this dog's. (I'm gonna call him Jesus--like hay-sus), but I know this much. "Jesus very soon"--the real Jesus. Don't stress about holiday preparations or spending money on gifts or not spending money on gifts. Remember two things. Jesus very soon, and Advent WOW. Nothing else really matters. Love to all y'all. Oh, and I learned about the pink candle this week, thanks to this picture. I'll t...
What Am I Waiting For?

What Am I Waiting For?

Spirituality
I spent the entire week taking in words and images that fed the hunger inside to create. It got greater and greater, until tonight when it became time to sit down and write this blog post. Hmph. Figures, huh? So what happened? I got quiet within myself and just waited. I kept waiting until something came. I had to laugh when it did. Sunday is the first day of Advent. What is Advent about? Preparing yourself and waiting until something or Someone comes. I just looked at Wikipedia, and it calls Advent "expectant waiting." Was that what I've been doing all week? Expectant waiting? Reading the blogs and stalking the people on Facebook who seem to have gotten it already? Following the images of something greater than I could ever create, thinking, "Wow, if only...I wish I could...God, please...
Lectio Divina–Inspiration Sunday

Lectio Divina–Inspiration Sunday

Spirituality
I've long been fascinated with the concept of lectio divina (divine reading) of sacred texts as a means of becoming closer to God and learning more about the Scriptures. Lectio divina was established as a monastic practice by the Benedictines in the 6th century and was formalized into a 4-step process by Guigo II, a Carthusian monk, in the 12th century. Its 4 parts--reading, meditating, praying, and contemplating--do not have to be used on Christian scriptures, though. All faiths can use this way of reading their own texts or even books that don't have any "spiritual" connotation. Do you love to read current fiction? Read it with a lectio divina mindset. You may be surprised at where you find God's presence. How about poetry? Even the most "secular" of poets has a creative spirit, which...