ahini-kinau reserve

ahini-kinau reserve by terrijane01
ahini-kinau reserve, a photo by terrijane01 on Flickr.

It was impossible to get a bad shot on the Ahini-Kinau reserve. So beautiful.

‘Ahihi-Kina‘u
Established in 1973, ‘Ahihi-Kina‘u was the first reserve in the Natural Area Reserve System and as such is the anchor gem in a priceless statewide system. Hot, dry, and sparsely vegetated, the reserve is unique in that its boundaries contain the most recent a‘a‘ lava flow on Maui, here on the dry south flank of Haleakala. Unlike most NARs, 'Ahihi-Kina'u also includes a marine component--the surrounding reef systems shelter a complex assemblage of organisms, most of them endemic to the Hawaiian archipelago. Fragile and imperiled anchialine pools, housing a high diversity of rare Hawaiian shrimps, are protected within this Reserve and are off-limits for their own protection. Coastal dry shrublands, coastal mesic boulder beach communities, and examples of pioneer vegetation also serve as habitats for other rare native plants and animals--primarily insects and birds. (from hawaii.gov).

Also on the land are cultural relics from hundreds of years ago (the last lava flow was in the 1700s...so after that). The people native to this land built a system of lava rock walls for filtering water/catching fish, burial sites, etc. Miles upon miles of walls built by hand with lava rock. Lava rock is rough stuff, too!

Categories: Spirituality

3 comments

  1. Steven said on March 23, 2012
    I lived on Maui for about 3 years in the 1980's. Some of my best memories are on the cliffs, or at the beach. When I left, my friends said I would return one day after I tossed my lei into the ocean and it came right back. Hope they were right. :) Shalom
    1. Terri said on March 23, 2012
      I believe Maui would be an easy place to return to! If you want to assuage some Maui-missing, you can look at my photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/cloakedmonk/
  2. granbee said on March 27, 2012
    Coastal dry shrublands and rare shrimp and hand-built miles of lava rock walls are items I would never had dreamed of finding anywhere in the Hawaiin Islands! Bless you for sharing these wonders here, Terri!

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