Mindful Monday: Attachment to strong opinions

"As Buddhists, we need not give up even strong opinions and positions – but we do have to give up attachment to them. Not being attached to them is to abandon the idea that because I think or believe something, it is true. And abandon the idea that the opinions of others are somehow lacking just because they are another’s idea, not mine. This makes commitment to growing, evolving truth more important than opinions and positions. The great philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche said, 'A very popular error: having the courage of one’s convictions; rather it is a matter of having the courage for an attack on one’s convictions.'

"This is the Buddhist way, too. Having a conviction, opinion, position, is inevitable. Holding to it carries no great virtue. Virtue is, while having a position, being open and even inviting challenges. That has the additional virtue of being a form of loving one’s enemy."

--Joel Baehr*

What are you noticing about holding onto opinions during these tumultuous times?

Blowin' in the wind...

for Mindful Monday

 
Source: *Joel Baehr, "Buddhism and Politics," 2010.
Photo Credit: "Blowin' in the wind," Simon Harrod, 2011.

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  1. Learning Labs Consulting said on November 30, 2015
    "As Buddhists, we need not give up even strong opinions and positions – but we do have to give up attachment to them." Well said. When I teach mindfulness, I often have to tell people they are not going to be "zen" all the time. The goal isn't not to have thoughts and feelings, but to get some distance from them. Thanks for sharing.

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