Blessed Be Revisited

Blessed Be...this is a spin-off of sorts from an earlier posting.  I wanted to share two variations on the task of creating new beautitudes that particularly spoke to me at the Blessed Be Poetry Party invited by Christine Valters Paintner.  I will share one today and one tomorrow!

An offering by Wronda:

Blessed are the peacemakers for they do not settle for the status quo.
Blessed are the peacemakers for they stand in front of the tanks rolling through the square.
Blessed are the peacemakers for they sit at the front of the bus.
Blessed are the peacemakers for they proclaim the truth.
Blessed are the peacemakers for they bear witness to the light.
Blessed are the peacemakers for they never let those lost to hate, be forgotten.
Blessed are the peacemakers for they hold the bodies of the lepers.
Blessed are the peacemakers for they place food into the mouths of the hungry.
Blessed are the peacemakers for they will never go quietly into the night.

Her comments:

Peacemaker has connotations to it that make it seem less desirable to me – at least at first. Blessed are the doormats – blessed are those who never make waves – blessed are the wimps.  But then I started naming peacemakers – Jesus, Bonhoeffer, Romero, Mother Teresa, Rosa Parks, The Cellist of Sarajevo, a student in Tiananman Square.

My reflection:

Just today I was in a "conversation" online with someone who thinks that having government programs move toward compassion is bad because it points to the failure of Jesus' people doing the work.  Honestly, I don't know what to do with that.  I think Jesus loves each person named here--Bonhoeffer, Romero, Mother Teresa, Rosa Parks, The Cellist of Sarajevo, a student in Tiananman Square.  I don't know about the cellist, but I would bet even money that the student in Tiananman Square is not a Christian and the cellist may very well be Muslim.  And yet, they did justice and stood for moving a system towards justice as all these people did.  It got me to wondering...

  • How can we be so shortsighted as to think that compassion and justice is the workplace of only Christians?
  • How can we think that non-Christians are amoral? 
  • Who is defining what a Christian is and handing out the Christian cards? 
  • How can we limit the work of God to just the followers of Jesus?
  • How is a move towards systemic compassion unChristian?

I guess, I just don't get it.  Someone needs to explain to me how caring for more people, no matter whose hands are delivering the care, is unChristian.  Someone needs to explain to me how allowing people to suffer and die embodies the value of Love God and Neighbor.  Someone needs to explain to me where Jesus said to treat your neighbor as yourself as long as they have earned it

Pink font indicates possible inappropriate use of humor, sarcasm, or heretical statements.

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